Trump administration delists gray wolves: Response from the experts

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On 29 October 2020, the US Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) announced the “successful recovery” of the US gray wolf population, with US Secretary of the Interior Secretary David Bernhardt stating that the species had “exceeded all conservation goals for recovery.” These claims have been rebutted by numerous experts, who argue that the delisting decision is premature.
Writing in BioScience, independent ecologist Carlos Carroll and colleagues argue that the declarations of recovery should be based on a more ambitious definition of recovery than one requiring the existence of a single secure population. Instead, they propose a framework for the “conservation of adaptive potential,” which builds on existing agency practice to enhance the effectiveness of the Act. The authors argue that such an approach is particularly crucial in light of climate change and other ongoing threats to species.
On this episode of BioScience Talks, Dr. Carroll is joined by coauthors Adrian Treves, Bridgett vonHoldt, and Dan Rohlf to discuss the recent USFWS action as well as prospects for gray wolf conservation.

To hear the whole discussion, visit this link for this latest episode of the BioScience Talks podcast.

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BioScience, published monthly by Oxford Journals, is the journal of the American Institute of Biological Sciences (AIBS). BioScience is a forum for integrating the life sciences that publishes commentary and peer-reviewed articles. The journal has been published since 1964. AIBS is an organization for professional scientific societies and organizations, and individuals, involved with biology. AIBS provides decision-makers with high-quality, vetted information for the advancement of biology and society. Follow BioScience on Twitter @AIBSbiology.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/biosci/biaa125

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