The link between handgrip strength and healthy lungs in older women

As we age, we may become weaker as our muscles tend to lose their mass and strength. This condition of losing muscle mass is called sarcopenia. Sarcopenia can lead to problems performing your daily activities, such as shopping, socializing, and taking care of yourself and your home. Having sarcopenia can lessen your quality of life–and your independence.

A simple, fast way to test your overall muscle strength is by measuring the strength of your handgrip. In the test, you grip a small device as hard as you can, and it measures the strength of your grip. Studies have shown that handgrip strength is closely linked to muscle mass and other signs of your general health, including nutrition and walking ability. What's more, handgrip strength is considered an important test for diagnosing sarcopenia. Weak handgrip strength can predict low muscle mass and poor physical performance.

Research has linked handgrip strength to other health problems in older adults. Losing muscle strength as you age also means losing muscle strength in your respiratory system. (The respiratory system is the part of your body responsible for breathing.) This can lead to poor lung function. When your lungs don't function properly, you are at higher risk for respiratory issues like bronchitis and pneumonia, as well as heart disease and even death.

<p>However, little is known about the link between handgrip strength and lung function in older adults. A team of researchers recently decided to learn whether testing handgrip strength could help identify lung function in older Korean women. Their study was published in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society.</p>     <p>The researchers used information from the 2014-2015 Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (KNHANES), which was conducted by the Korea Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (KCDC). KNHANES is a nationwide survey that looks at health and nutrition for Koreans.</p>    <p>The survey consists of three sections: a health interview, a nutrition survey, and a health examination. The health examination consisted of blood pressure measurements, eye and mouth exams, laboratory tests, and several other tests (including ones for strength). The researchers looked at a smaller group of survey participants: 1,773 healthy women between the ages of 65 to 79.</p>      <p>The researchers learned that among the 1,773 women they studied, handgrip strength was linked to lung capacity--a measure of how well your respiratory system functions. The researchers concluded that testing older adults' handgrip strength could be a good way to test their potential for impaired lung health.</p>   <p>This summary is from &quot;Relationship between Handgrip Strength and pulmonary function in apparently healthy older women.&quot; It appears online ahead of print in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society. The study authors are Da-Hye Son, MD; Ji-Won Yoo, MD; Mi-Ra Cho, MD; and Yong-Jae Lee, MD, MPH, PhD.</p>   <p>###</p>      <strong><p>About the Health in Aging Foundation</p></strong>    <p>This research summary was developed as a public education tool by the Health in Aging Foundation. The Foundation is a national non-profit established in 1999 by the American Geriatrics Society to bring the knowledge and expertise of geriatrics healthcare professionals to the public. We are committed to ensuring that people are empowered to advocate for high-quality care by providing them with trustworthy information and reliable resources. Last year, we reached nearly 1 million people with our resources through HealthinAging.org. We also help nurture current and future geriatrics leaders by supporting opportunities to attend educational events and increase exposure to principles of excellence on caring for older adults. For more information or to support the Foundation's work, visit http://www.HealthinAgingFoundation.org.</p>   <strong><p>About the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society</p></strong>    <p>Included in more than 9,000 library collections around the world, the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society (JAGS) highlights emerging insights on principles of aging, approaches to older patients, geriatric syndromes, geriatric psychiatry, and geriatric diseases and disorders. First published in 1953, JAGS is now one of the oldest and most impactful publications on gerontology and geriatrics, according to ISI Journal Citation ReportsĀ®. Visit wileyonlinelibrary.com/journal/JGS for more details.</p>     <strong><p>About the American Geriatrics Society</p></strong>   <p>Founded in 1942, the American Geriatrics Society (AGS) is a nationwide, not-for-profit society of geriatrics healthcare professionals that has--for 75 years--worked to improve the health, independence, and quality of life of older people. Its nearly 6,000 members include geriatricians, geriatric nurses, social workers, family practitioners, physician assistants, pharmacists, and internists. The Society provides leadership to healthcare professionals, policymakers, and the public by implementing and advocating for programs in patient care, research, professional and public education, and public policy. For more information, visit AmericanGeriatrics.org.  </p>                               <p><strong>Media Contact</strong></p>    <p>Daniel E. Trucil<br />[email protected]<br />212-308-1414<br /> @AmerGeriatrics     

http://www.americangeriatrics.org/

       http://www.healthinaging.org/blog/the-link-between-handgrip-strength-and-healthy-lungs-in-older-women/ <h4>Related Journal Article</h4>http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/jgs.15410 
Comments
%d bloggers like this: