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Stereotypes about Native Americans and alcohol debunked by UA study

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IMAGE: A study by researchers at the UA College of Medicine – Tucson dispels myths about Native Americans and drinking.

Credit: Photo: University of Arizona Health Sciences

TUCSON, Ariz. – In contrast to enduring stories about extraordinarily high rates of alcohol misuse among Native Americans, University of Arizona researchers have found that Native Americans' binge and heavy drinking rates actually match those of whites. The groups differed regarding abstinence: Native Americans were more likely to abstain from alcohol use.

The UA study, published online Feb. 8 in the journal Drug and Alcohol Dependence, was conducted by James K. Cunningham, PhD, lead author, a U.S. Fulbright scholar and social epidemiologist with the UA Department of Family and Community Medicine and the UA Native American Research and Training Center; Teshia A. Solomon, PhD, (Choctaw), director of the Native American Research and Training Center; and Myra Muramoto, MD, MPH, head of Family and Community Medicine.

The researchers analyzed data from a survey of more than 4,000 Native Americans and 170,000 whites between 2009 and 2013. Called the National Survey on Drug Use and Health, the survey was administered by the U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration. The UA study also used another nationally representative survey, the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System administered by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, to measure how often Native Americans and whites engaged in excessive drinking in the past month. Again, findings for the two groups were comparable.

About 17 percent of both Native Americans and whites were found to be binge drinkers, and about 8 percent of both groups were heavy drinkers. Binge drinking was defined as five or more drinks on one to four days in the past month. Heavy drinking was five or more drinks on five or more days in the past month. Sixty percent of Native Americans reported no alcohol use in the past month, compared to 43 percent of whites.

"Of course, debunking a stereotype doesn't mean that alcohol problems don't exist," Dr. Cunningham said. "All major U.S. racial and ethnic groups face problems due to alcohol abuse, and alcohol use within those groups can vary with geographic location, age and gender.

"But falsely stereotyping a group regarding alcohol can have its own unique consequences. For example, some employers might be reluctant to hire individuals from a group that has been stereotyped regarding alcohol. Patients from such a group, possibly wanting to avoid embarrassment, may be reluctant to discuss alcohol-related problems with their doctors," he said.

Dr. Solomon noted that comparable rates of alcohol use do not necessarily result in comparable rates of alcohol-related health problems. "Native Americans as a group have less access to medical care, safe housing and quality food, which can amplify health problems connected to alcohol," she said.

"Negative stereotyping of groups of people who have less access to health care creates even more health disparities," Dr. Muramoto said. "Based on a false negative stereotype, some health-care providers may inaccurately attribute a presenting health problem to alcohol use and fail to appropriately diagnose and treat the problem."

The researchers feel that their study could impact beliefs about Native Americans' alcohol use.

"It's our hope that the media–movies, television, newspapers, radio, Internet–will represent Native American alcohol use more accurately," Dr. Cunningham said. "It's time to let the myths about elevated drinking fade away."

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A summary of the report, "Alcohol use among Native Americans compared to whites: Examining the veracity of the 'Native American elevated alcohol consumption' belief," can be accessed at: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S037687161501830X

About the Native American Research and Training Center

The Native American Research and Training Center (NARTC) was established in 1983 by the University of Arizona Board of Regents to serve as a resource in health-related research and training for Native American communities nationwide. Because of the Center's commitment to the realization of self-determination, one of the primary objectives of the Center is to promote active participation and partnership with Native communities in all of the Center's activities. For more information: http://nartc.fcm.arizona.edu

About the UA College of Medicine – Tucson

The University of Arizona College of Medicine – Tucson is advancing health and wellness through state-of-the-art medical education programs, groundbreaking research, and advancements in patient care in Arizona and across the United States. Founded in 1967, the College ranks among the top medical schools in the nation for research and primary care and is leading the way in academic medicine through its partnership with Banner – University Medicine, a new division of one of the largest nonprofit health-care systems in the country. For more information, please visit http://medicine.arizona.edu

About the University of Arizona Health Sciences

The University of Arizona Health Sciences is the statewide leader in biomedical research and health professions training. The UA Health Sciences includes the UA Colleges of Medicine (Phoenix and Tucson), Nursing, Pharmacy and Mel and Enid Zuckerman College of Public Health, with main campus locations in Tucson and the growing Phoenix Biomedical Campus in downtown Phoenix. From these vantage points, the UA Health Sciences reaches across the state of Arizona and the greater Southwest to provide cutting-edge health education, research, patient care and community outreach services. A major economic engine, the UA Health Sciences employs almost 5,000 people, has nearly 1,000 faculty members and garners more than $126 million in research grants and contracts annually. For more information: http://uahs.arizona.edu

Media Contact

Jane Erikson
[email protected]
520-334-9464

http://www.ahsc.arizona.edu

3 Comments
  1. dave says

    Then, why, on my visit to Gallup New Mexico, the only really drunk men I saw walking down the middle of the road at Noon were “Native Americans”?

  2. Alvin not a chipmunk says

    Goofy Dave:
    Because personal, unrepeatable anecdotal information is usually unreliable. There happen to be a LOT of Natives in Gallup. Even at a rate of 25 percent ‘binge and heavy drinkers,’ that’s a lot of drinkers. The study didn’t say that there were NO Indians who drank heavily in Gallup.
    I’ve seen a LOT of drunk White people in San Francisco bars over the years, but that doesn’t mean ALL White people live in San Francisco, OR are heavy drinkers.
    Maybe read the article, and apply logic?

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