Rare earth magnet recycling is a grind — this new process takes a simpler approach

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Credit: US Department of Energy, Ames Laboratory

A new recycling process developed at the U.S. Department of Energy's Critical Materials Institute (CMI) turns discarded hard disk drive (HDD) magnets into new magnet material in a few steps, and tackles both the economic and environmental issues typically associated with mining e-waste for valuable materials.

Ryan Ott, a scientist at Ames Laboratory and a member of the CMI research team, said that with an ever-increasing amount of discarded electronics globally, it made sense to focus on the most ubiquitous source of valuable rare earth magnets in that waste stream–hard disk drives, which have a relatively centralized scrap source.

"There are a lot of ways to go about getting the rare-earth elements out of e-waste, and some of them are very effective, but some create unwanted by-products and the recovered elements still need to be incorporated into a new application," said Ott. "Here we have eliminated as many processing steps as we can, and go straight from the discarded magnet to an end product, which is a new magnet."

Scrapped HDD magnets are collected, then any protective coatings are removed. The magnets are crushed into powder, which is then deposited on a substrate using plasma spray to synthesize coatings ½ to 1 mm thick. The properties of the end product are customizable depending on processing controls.

While the new magnetic material cannot retain the exceptional magnetic properties of the original material, it potentially fills market needs for an economical choice where the performance of a high-strength rare-earth magnet is not required, but lower performance magnets like ferrites are not sufficient.

The method is also an efficient way to produce strong magnets for small places, like sleek hand-held electronics.

"This waste reduction aspect of this process is really two-fold; we're not only reusing end-of-life magnets," said Ott. "We are also reducing the amount of manufacturing waste produced in making thin and small geometry magnets out of larger bulk materials."

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The Critical Materials Institute is a Department of Energy Innovation Hub led by the U.S. Department of Energy's Ames Laboratory and supported by the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy's Advanced Manufacturing Office, which supports early-stage research to advance innovation in U.S. manufacturing and promote American economic growth and energy security. CMI seeks ways to eliminate and reduce reliance on rare-earth metals and other materials critical to the success of clean energy technologies.

Ames Laboratory is a U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science national laboratory operated by Iowa State University. Ames Laboratory creates innovative materials, technologies and energy solutions. We use our expertise, unique capabilities and interdisciplinary collaborations to solve global problems.

Ames Laboratory is supported by the Office of Science of the U.S. Department of Energy. The Office of Science is the single largest supporter of basic research in the physical sciences in the United States, and is working to address some of the most pressing challenges of our time. For more information, please visit science.energy.gov.

Media Contact

Laura Millsaps
[email protected]
@Ames_Laboratory

http://www.external.ameslab.gov

Original Source

https://www.ameslab.gov/news/news-releases/rare-earth-magnet-recycling-grind-new-process-takes-simpler-approach

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