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NASA’s Aqua satellite sees remnants of Tropical Cyclone Tokage

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Credit: NASA Goddard MODIS Rapid Response Team

Tropical Cyclone Tokage fell apart after crossing the Philippines and moving into the South China Sea where wind shear battered the storm. NASA's Aqua satellite took a visible picture of the storm as it was being torn apart on Nov. 28.

The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer or MODIS instrument aboard NASA's Aqua satellite captured a visible image of Tokage's remnants in the South China Sea on Nov. 28 at 1240 a.m. EST (540 UTC). The image showed that the bulk of clouds associated with the remnants were pushed north of the center of circulation.

On Nov. 28 at 4 a.m. EST (0900 UTC), the Joint Typhoon Warning Center (JTWC) issued their final warning on Tokage. At that time Tokage had maximum sustained winds near 28.7 mph (25 knots/46.3 kph) and they were weakening. The storm was located near 16.3 degrees north latitude and 116.7 degrees east longitude, about 242 nautical miles west-northwest of Manila, Philippines. It was moving to the southwest at 19.5 mph (17 knots/31.4 kph).

JTWC noted that "animated multispectral satellite imagery reveals that the remnants of Tokage has embedded within the northeasterly cold surge which has caused it to accelerate southwestward and almost completely unravel."

The remnants are expected to continue to move to the southwest and completely dissipate.

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Media Contact

Rob Gutro
[email protected]
@NASAGoddard

http://www.nasa.gov/goddard

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