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NASA sees short-lived Tropical Depression 22W make landfall

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Credit: Credits: NASA Goddard MODIS Rapid

NASA's Terra satellite captured the landfall of Tropical Depression 22W in northern Vietnam. The Depression only existed for two days before it made landfall and began dissipating.

Tropical Depression 22W formed in the South China Sea just west of the northern Philippines on Sept. 23 around 5 p.m. EDT (2100 UTC) and moved across Hainan and into northern Vietnam.

The MODIS instrument or Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer that flies aboard NASA's Terra satellite captured a visible picture of the depression on Sept. 24, in the afternoon (local time). The depression appeared asymmetric from northeast to southwest over the Vietnam coast.

The Joint Typhoon Warning Center issued their final advisory on the system on Monday, Sept. 25 at 5 a.m. EDT (0900 UTC). At that time 22W had already made landfall in northern Vietnam and was centered near 21.1 degrees north latitude and 106.9 degrees east longitude, about 56 miles east of Hanoi, Vietnam.

22W had maximum sustained winds near 30 knots (34.5 mph/55.5 kph) and was moving to the northwest at 15 knots (17.2 mph/27.7 kph).

Tropical depression 22W is expected to dissipate over the next day or two.

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Media Contact

Rob Gutro
[email protected]
@NASAGoddard

http://www.nasa.gov/goddard

Original Source

https://www.nasa.gov/feature/goddard/2017/22w-nw-pacific-ocean

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