NASA catches a view of a fading Tropical Cyclone Daniel

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Credit: NASA Goddard Rapid Response Team

Tropical Storm Daniel was weakening when NASA's Terra satellite passed overhead on June 24 and by June 26 the storm degenerated into a remnant low pressure area.

On June 24, the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer or MODIS instrument aboard NASA's Terra satellite captured a visible image of Tropical Storm Daniel at 2:30 p.m. EDT (1830 UTC), when it was off the west coast of Mexico. The image showed a small, concentrated area of strong storms around the center of circulation with bands of thunderstorms feeding into the center.

Two and a half hours later, the National Hurricane Center noted "Daniel continues to generate a curved band of convection near the center, although the cloud tops have warmed notably during the past several hours."

At 11 a.m. EDT (1500 UTC) on June 26, the National Hurricane Center (NHC) issued the final advisory on Daniel. At that time, the center of Post-Tropical Cyclone Daniel was located near latitude 20.0 degrees north and longitude 120.2 degrees west. That's about 690 miles (1,115 km) west-southwest

The post-tropical cyclone is moving toward the west-northwest near 9 mph (15 kph). NHC forecasters noted that a westward motion is expected to start later today. Maximum sustained winds are near 30 mph (45 kph) with higher gusts and is forecast to dissipate by Wednesday night, June 27.

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       <h4>Original Source</h4>https://www.nasa.gov/feature/goddard/2018/daniel-eastern-pacific-ocean 
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