Monika Goyal M.D., M.S.C.E., consultant on $5 million NIH grant to reduce pediatric firearm injuries

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Credit: Children's National Health System

Monika Goyal M.D., M.S.C.E., director of research in Children's Division of Emergency Medicine and Trauma Services, has been named a consultant on a new $5 million National Institutes of Health research grant that represents the agency's largest funding commitment in more than two decades to reduce pediatric firearm injuries.

"I am honored that Children's National Health System is among the 12 universities and health systems around the nation selected to work collaboratively to identify solutions to lower pediatric deaths and injuries due to firearms," Dr. Goyal says. "This grant will expand the nation's research capacity on this important subject area and will power the next wave of research to inform policy at the state and national level."

Dr. Goyal is a member of Children's firearms research work group which has published or presented at academic meetings on topics that include efforts to reduce pediatric firearm-related injuries and the pivotal role pediatricians can play in reducing the burden of firearm-related injuries among children.

Faculty from Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago/Northwestern University, Arizona State University, Brown University, Children's National Health System, Columbia University, Harvard University, Medical College of Wisconsin, Michigan State University, University of Colorado, University of Michigan, University of Pennsylvania and University of Washington make up the Firearm-Safety Among Children & Teens Consortium (FACTS). The initiative is co-led by Rebecca Cunningham, M.D., and Marc Zimmerman, Ph.D., of the University of Michigan.

In addition to tapping the expertise of scientists and researchers who specialize in criminal justice, emergency medicine, pediatrics, psychology, public health and trauma surgery, FACTS will include a stakeholder group that includes teachers, parent groups, gun owners, firearm safety trainers and law enforcement partners.

The five-year grant will produce a number of deliverables, including:

  • A research agenda for the field of pediatric firearm injury
  • Generating preliminary data through five small pilot projects that focus on topics such as the epidemiology of pediatric firearm injuries and prevention of firearm injuries
  • A data archive on childhood firearm injury
  • Training for the next generation of researchers, including postdoctoral trainees and graduate students

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Financial support for this research was provided by the National Institute of Child Health & Human Development under award number R24HD087149.

Media Contact

Diedtra Henderson
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http://www.childrensnational.org/

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