Modifying baby formula doesn’t prevent type 1 diabetes in children

PITTSBURGH, Jan. 2, 2018 – The long-awaited results from the first large international trial to try to prevent type 1 diabetes shows that modified baby formula in which cow's milk proteins have been split does not prevent type 1 diabetes in children with genetic risk factors for the condition, according to researchers at Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh of UPMC, the coordinating center for the U.S. arm of the study. The findings were published today in the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Previous studies have reported that early exposure to complex foreign proteins, such as cow's milk proteins, may increase the risk of type 1 diabetes in young children with genetic risk for type 1 diabetes.

In 2002, the research team for TRIGR (Trial to Reduce IDDM in the Genetically at Risk), led in the U.S. by principal investigator Dorothy Becker, M.D., professor of pediatrics at Children's Hospital and the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, embarked on a large-scale study of 2,159 infants with a family member affected by type 1 diabetes and with genetic risk for type 1 diabetes to find out whether delaying the exposure to complex foreign proteins such as cow's milk proteins would decrease the risk of diabetes.

After breastfeeding, infants were either weaned to a special formula (extensively hydrolyzed casein formula), with the cow's milk proteins split into small peptides (small pieces of the protein), or a regular cow's milk-based formula with intact cow's milk proteins. Infants were fed the study formula for at least two months until the age of 6 to 8 months and at the same time were given no cow's milk proteins from any other food sources. The children were followed for at least 10 years to determine which children developed diabetes.

At 11.5 years of follow up, weaning to an extensively hydrolyzed casein formula during infancy did not result in a reduction in the incidence of type 1 diabetes compared to regular, intact cow's-milk-based formula.

"After more than 15 years of effort, this study puts to rest the controversy regarding the potential role of cow's milk formula in the development of type 1 diabetes," said Becker. "This once more shows us that there is no easy way to prevent type 1 diabetes. Accordingly, there is no evidence to revise the current dietary recommendations for infants at high risk for type 1 diabetes. We need to chip away at our research efforts around the world to find interventions that may change the pre-diabetes course. Ongoing work of our study is doing just that."

###

The TRIGR study was conducted in 15 countries and funded by the National Institutes of Health, the Canadian Institutes of Health Research and the Commission of the European Communities.

About Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh of UPMC

Regionally, nationally, and globally, Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh of UPMC is a leader in the treatment of childhood conditions and diseases, a pioneer in the development of new and improved therapies, and a top educator of the next generation of pediatricians and pediatric subspecialists. Children's Hospital has fulfilled this mission since its founding in 1890. Children's is named consistently to several elite lists of pediatric hospitals, including ranking 10th among children's hospitals and schools of medicine (FY 2016) in funding for pediatric research provided by the National Institutes of Health, and is one of 10 pediatric hospitals in the United States named to the U.S. News & World Report Honor Roll of America's "Best Children's Hospitals" for 2017-2018.

http://www.chp.edu/pressroom

Media Contact

Andrea Kunicky
Office: 412-692-6254
Mobile: 412-439-5264
E-mail: [email protected]

Marc Lukasiak
Office: 412-692-7919
Mobile: 412-721-2120
E-mail: [email protected]

Comments

This website uses cookies to improve your experience. We'll assume you're ok with this, but you can opt-out if you wish. Accept Read More

%d bloggers like this: