LOOP technique for I&D of abscesses in adults is safe, effective alternative to I&D with packing

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Credit: KIRSTY CHALLEN, B.SC., MBCHB, MRES, PH.D., LANCASHIRE TEACHING HOSPITALS, UNITED KINGDOM

DES PLAINES, IL — The LOOP technique for incision and drainage (I&D) of abscesses in adults is a safe and effective alternative to the traditional I & D with packing and may offer an alternative to the standard regimen in the treatment of uncomplicated skin abscesses in pediatric patients. That is the conclusion of a study to be published in the December 2020 issue of Academic Emergency Medicine (AEM), a journal of the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine (SAEM).

The lead author of the study is Dr. Jay Ladde, an academic emergency physician working at Orlando Regional Medical Center serving as core faculty and senior associate program director. Dr. Ladde also has the rank professor of emergency medicine for University of Central Florida College of Medicine.

The clinical trial compared the failure rate of incision and drainage (I&D) with LOOP technique, versus I&D with standard packing technique, in adults and children presenting to the emergency department (ED) with subcutaneous abscess. In conclusion, the LOOP and packing techniques were found to have similar failure rates for treatment of subcutaneous abscesses in adults, but the LOOP technique had significantly fewer failures in children. Overall, pain and patient satisfaction were significantly better in patients treated using the LOOP technique.

The authors suggest that with further study, this technique may offer an alternative to this standard regimen in the treatment of uncomplicated skin abscesses in pediatric patients.

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The findings of the study are discussed with the author in a recent AEM podcast, “Here We Go LOOP de LOOP to Treat Abscesses.”

ABOUT ACADEMIC EMERGENCY MEDICINE

Academic Emergency Medicine, the monthly journal of Society for Academic Emergency Medicine, features the best in peer-reviewed, cutting-edge original research relevant to the practice and investigation of emergency care. The above study is published open access and can be downloaded by following the DOI link: 10.1111/acem.14106. Journalists wishing to interview the authors may contact Stacey Roseen at [email protected]

ABOUT THE SOCIETY FOR ACADEMIC EMERGENCY MEDICINE

SAEM is a 501(c)(3) not-for-profit organization dedicated to the improvement of care of the acutely ill and injured patient by leading the advancement of academic emergency medicine through education and research, advocacy, and professional development. To learn more, visit saem.org.

Media Contact
Stacey Roseen
[email protected]

Related Journal Article

http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/acem.14106

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