Hip hop music teaches children, parents to recognize stroke and act quickly

DALLAS, March 22, 2018 — An intervention that uses hip hop music with stroke education lyrics increased stroke awareness for economically-disadvantaged, minority children and their parents, according to new research in the American Heart Association's journal Stroke.

"The lack of stroke recognition, especially among blacks, results in dangerous delays in treatment," said Olajide Williams, M.D., M.S., study author and associate professor of neurology at Columbia University Medical Center, New York Presbyterian Hospital. "Because of those delays, only a quarter of all stroke patients arrive at the hospital within the ideal time for clot-busting treatment."

Stroke education is important even for children because simply calling 9-1-1 immediately when stroke symptoms start could increase the rate of optimal stroke treatment by 24 percent. Usually a witness makes the 9-1-1 call – something even a child can do.

Other campaigns to improve stroke awareness have been limited by the high costs of advertising, lack of cultural tailoring and low penetration into ethnic minority populations. Ultimately, the desired effect of calling 9-1-1 has dissipated once the media campaign ended.

Researchers studying more than 3,000 4th through 6th graders from 22 public schools in New York City and a group of 1,144 of their parents found "Hip Hop Stroke", a three-hour multimedia stroke awareness intervention, increased optimal stroke knowledge from 2 percent of children before the intervention to 57 percent right after. Three months later, 24 percent of children retained that knowledge.

They also found:

While only 3 percent of parents could identify all stroke symptoms in the FAST acronym before the intervention, 20 percent could immediately after and 17 percent could three months later.

Four of the children put in practice what they learned in the intervention and called 911 for real-life stroke symptoms, including one who overruled a parent's suggestion to wait and see.

The Hip Hop Stroke program, according to Williams, is available and free to U.S. communities.

"The program's culturally-tailored multimedia presentation is particularly effective among minority youth or other groups among whom Hip Hop music is popular," Williams said. "One unique aspect of the program is that the children who receive the program in school are used as 'transmission vectors' of stroke information to their parents and grandparents at home. Our trial showed that this is an effective strategy."

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Co-authors are Ellyn Leighton-Hermann Quinn, Ph.D.; Jeanne Teresi, Ed.D., Ph.D.; Joseph P. Eimicke, M.S.; Jian Kong, M.S.; Gbenga Ogedegbe, M.D., M.P.H.; and James Noble, M.D., M.S. Authors reported no conflicts of interest.

The National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke funded the study.

Additional Resources:

  • Available multimedia is on the right column of the release link – https://newsroom.heart.org/news/hip-hop-music-teaches-children-parents-to-recognize-stroke-and-act-quickly?preview=bd64943c5c202813a6b4e55eb3930b1b
  • After March 22, view the manuscript online.
  • EmPOWERED To Serve
  • F.A.S.T. Stroke Resources
  • F.A.S.T. Music Video
  • Follow AHA/ASA news on Twitter @HeartNews
  • For stroke science, follow the Stroke journal at @StrokeAHA_ASA

Statements and conclusions of study authors published in American Heart Association scientific journals are solely those of the study authors and do not necessarily reflect the association's policy or position. The association makes no representation or guarantee as to their accuracy or reliability. The association receives funding primarily from individuals; foundations and corporations (including pharmaceutical, device manufacturers and other companies) also make donations and fund specific association programs and events. The association has strict policies to prevent these relationships from influencing the science content. Revenues from pharmaceutical and device corporations and health insurance providers are available at http://www.heart.org/corporatefunding.

About the American Heart Association

The American Heart Association is devoted to saving people from heart disease and stroke – the two leading causes of death in the world. We team with millions of volunteers to fund innovative research, fight for stronger public health policies, and provide lifesaving tools and information to prevent and treat these diseases. The Dallas-based association is the nation's oldest and largest voluntary organization dedicated to fighting heart disease and stroke. To learn more or to get involved, call 1-800-AHA-USA1, visit heart.org or call any of our offices around the country. Follow us on Facebook and Twitter.

About the American Stroke Association

The American Stroke Association is devoted to saving people from stroke — the No. 2 cause of death in the world and a leading cause of serious disability. We team with millions of volunteers to fund innovative research, fight for stronger public health policies and provide lifesaving tools and information to prevent and treat stroke. The Dallas-based association officially launched in 1998 as a division of the American Heart Association. To learn more or to get involved, call 1-888-4STROKE or visit StrokeAssociation.org. Follow us on Facebook and Twitter.

Media Contact

Karen Astle
[email protected]
214-706-1392
@HeartNews

http://www.heart.org

https://newsroom.heart.org/news/hip-hop-music-teaches-children-parents-to-recognize-stroke-and-act-quickly?preview=bd64943c5c202813a6b4e55eb3930b1b

Related Journal Article

http://dx.doi.org/10.1161/STROKEAHA.117.019861

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