Danger changes how rat brain stores information

The male rat brain changes how it stores information depending on whether the environment in which it learns is safe or dangerous, according to new research published in eNeuro.

Emotionally charged information, such as danger, is processed by the amygdala. Although this brain region is typically not involved in the acquisition of harmless information, Nathan Holmes and colleagues previously showed that the amygdala is sensitive to the context in which rats learn an association between two neutral stimuli, a sound and a light. This learning was revealed when one stimulus was subsequently paired with a mild foot shock: rats exhibited freezing when finally tested with both stimuli, indicating that they had associated the stimulus that was not paired with a shock with the stimulus that was.

Using a similar approach in this study, the researchers demonstrate that the perirhinal cortex — a region in the medial temporal lobe — was involved in consolidating the association between the two stimuli when the rats were trained in a safe and familiar environment. On the other hand, the basolateral complex of the amygdala was involved in consolidating the same association when it was learned in a context where the rats had been previously shocked, thereby rendering the environment dangerous at the time of learning. This same region was also required for consolidation when the environment was safe at the time of learning, but rendered dangerous immediately after training.

###

Article: Danger changes the way the mammalian brain stores information about innocuous events: a study of sensory preconditioning in rats
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1523/ENEURO.0381-17.2018

Corresponding author:

Nathan Holmes
University of New South Wales
Sydney, Australia

About eNeuro

eNeuro, the Society for Neuroscience's new open-access journal launched in 2014, publishes rigorous neuroscience research with double-blind peer review that masks the identity of both the authors and reviewers, minimizing the potential for implicit biases. eNeuro is distinguished by a broader scope and balanced perspective achieved by publishing negative results, failure to replicate or replication studies. New research, computational neuroscience, theories and methods are also published.

About The Society for Neuroscience

The Society for Neuroscience is the world's largest organization of scientists and physicians devoted to understanding the brain and nervous system. The nonprofit organization, founded in 1969, now has nearly 37,000 members in more than 90 countries and over 130 chapters worldwide.

Media Contact

David Barnstone
[email protected]
202-962-4000
@SfNJournals

http://www.sfn.org

http://dx.doi.org/10.1523/ENEURO.0381-17.2018

Comments