CDC researchers examine HIV-related stigma among US healthcare providers

IMAGE

Credit: (c) 2018 Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers

New Rochelle, NY, October 5, 2018–A Systemic Review from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention analyzed studies of HIV-related stigma among healthcare provider and identified three main themes: attitudes, beliefs, and behaviors; quality of patient care; and education and training. The CDC researchers found that factors associated with HIV-related stigma varied by gender, race, category of provider, and type of clinical setting, according to the study results reported in AIDS Patient Care and STDs, a peer-reviewed journal from Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers. The full-text article is available free on the AIDS Patient Care and STDs website through November 5, 2018 at https://www.liebertpub.com/doi/full/10.1089/apc.2018.0114.

In the article entitled "HIV-Related Stigma by Healthcare Providers in the United States: A Systematic Reviewv," coauthors Angelica Geter, Adrienne Herron, and Madeline Sutton, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA, examined HIV-related stigma by healthcare providers for the purposes of applying their findings to the development of stigma-reduction interventions for healthcare providers in the U.S.

Among their findings, the researchers reported that stigma can be manifested through inadvertent behaviors and beliefs, such as homophobia, transphobia, racism, and negative views of people who inject drugs. This can create a barrier to HIV prevention, treatment, and care, whereas less stigmatizing attitudes by providers can help reduce social and structural barriers to HIV care across the care continuum. More overt HIV-related stigma may manifest as providers who take extreme precautionary measures during routine examinations, use of stigmatizing language, and even denial of necessary services or treatment.

"Most prior studies have focused on the importance of HIV stigma related to family, friends, and personal communities, and how it may prevent an individual from getting tested, seeking treatment, or continuing in HIV care. This study focuses on stigmatizing factors among health care providers themselves," says Editor-in-Chief Jeffrey Laurence, MD, Professor of Medicine, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, NY.

###

About the Journal

AIDS Patient Care and STDs is the leading peer-reviewed journal dedicated to diagnostics and therapeutics for providing optimal care for HIV/AIDS patients. Published monthly online with open access options and in print and online, the Journal spans the full spectrum of adult and pediatric HIV disease, diagnosis, treatment, prevention, and education, enabling clinicians to keep pace with the latest developments in this evolving field. Complete tables of content and a sample issue may be viewed on the AIDS Patient Care and STDs website.

About the Publisher

Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers is a privately held, fully integrated media company known for establishing authoritative peer-reviewed journals in many promising areas of science and biomedical research, including AIDS Research and Human Retroviruses, LGBT Health, Transgender Health, Viral Immunology, and Journal of Palliative Medicine. Its biotechnology trade magazine, GEN (Genetic Engineering & Biotechnology News), was the first in its field and is today the industry's most widely read publication worldwide. A complete list of the firm's 80 journals and books is available on the Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers website.

Media Contact

Kathryn Ryan
[email protected]
914-740-2250
@LiebertPub

http://www.liebertpub.com

Original Source

https://home.liebertpub.com/news/cdc-researchers-examine-hiv-related-stigma-among-us-healthcare-providers/2444 http://dx.doi.org/10.1089/apc.2018.0114

Comments