Adam Antebi to present at the 6th Aging Research for Drug Discovery Forum in Basel

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Credit: Insilico

Tuesday, April 30, 2019 – Today Insilico Medicine, a biotechnology company developing the end-to-end drug discovery pipeline utilizing the next generation artificial intelligence, and the Scheibye-Knudsen Lab, University of Copenhagen, announce the presentation of Adam Antebi, Ph.D., Director at the Max Planck Institute for Biology of Ageing, at the 6th Aging Research, Drug Discovery, and AI Forum during the Basel Life Congress, September 10-12, 2019, Basel, Switzerland.

Research over the last several decades has revealed a handful of metabolic signaling pathways that regulate animal life span, but to what extent they converge on common processes, is unclear. Adam Antebi will give a talk titled “Convergent mechanisms of longevity” presenting the convergent, evolutionarily conserved mechanisms that may lie at the heart of longevity, and help shed light on new ways to approach health and various diseases.

“By gaining fundamental insight into both pathway specific as well as shared mechanisms of longevity, we hope to maximally enhance health and life,” says Adam Antebi, Ph.D., Director at the Max Planck Institute for Biology of Ageing.

“It is a great pleasure to have professor Adam Antebi, Director of the Max Planck Institute for the Biology of Aging, presenting at our conference. Professor Antebi has been at the forefront in exploring aging in the model organism C. Elegans and has contributed greatly to our understanding of how metabolism impacts aging and how different metabolic cues can facilitate plasticity in the aging process. We are therefore extremely excited that Professor Antebi is joining us in Basel.” said Morten Scheibye-Knudsen, MD, Ph.D., University of Copenhagen.

“Over the last 5 years, the “Aging & Drug Discovery” and “AI for Healthcare” forums have been leading events at BaselLife, attracting hundreds of delegates from over 50 countries. This year, we are combining the 2 platforms into a 3 day-event titled “the 6th Aging, AI and Drug Discovery Forum” to explore the convergence of these 2 cutting edge disciplines. Under the program leadership of Professor Morten Scheibye-Knudsen and Dr. Alex Zhavoronkov, with distinguished scientists and industry experts in the field, we look forward to exploring breakthroughs for this great healthcare need for the planet,” said Dr. Bhupinder Bhullar, Chair, Innovation Forum program committee, Basel Life 2019.

“The 6th annual Aging Research, Drug Discovery, and AI Forum at Basel Life will have a fresh program featuring some of the most prominent scientists and industry players in aging and longevity research covering the theory, applications and convergence of these three exciting areas,” said Alex Zhavoronkov, Ph.D., Founder, and CEO of Insilico Medicine, Inc.

The 6th Aging Research for Drug Discovery Forum Basel will bring together leaders in the aging, longevity, and drug discovery field, to describe the latest progress in the molecular, cellular and organismal basis of aging and the search for interventions. Furthermore, the forum will include opinion leaders in AI to discuss the latest advances of this technology in the biopharmaceutical sector and how this can be applied to interventions. This event intends to bridge academic and commercial research and foster collaborations that will result in practical solutions to one of humanity’s most challenging problems: aging. The Forum will be held in Basel, Switzerland, September 10-12, 2019.

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Insilico Medicine Contact: Ola Popova

[email protected]

Website: http://insilico.com/

About Insilico Medicine, Inc

Insilico Medicine is regularly publishing research papers in peer-reviewed journals. The company was first to apply the generative adversarial networks (GANs) to the generation of the new molecular structures with the specified parameters and published a seminal peer-reviewed paper submitted in June 2016. The concept was further extended and augmented with advanced memory and reinforcement learning. One of the latest papers published in the Journals of Gerontology demonstrated the application of the deep neural networks to assessing the biological age of the patients. The latest special issue in Molecular Pharmaceutics featured several research papers by Insilico Medicine. Insilico published an overview of its results in aging research including the development of AI aging biomarkers, target identification, cross-species comparison and geroprotector discovery in Aging Research Reviews, one of the highest-impact journals in the field.

In 2017, NVIDIA selected Insilico Medicine as one of the Top 5 AI companies in its potential for social impact. In 2018, the company was named one of the global top 100 AI companies by CB Insights. In 2018 it received the Frost & Sullivan 2018 North American Artificial Intelligence for Aging Research and Drug Development Award accompanied with the industry brief. Brief company video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=l62jlwgL3v8.

Website: http://insilico.com/

About Adam Antebi

Dr. Antebi received his PhD in Biology from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1992, and performed his post-doctoral studies at the Johns Hopkins University Baltimore, MD. From 1997 he worked as a Max Planck Independent Group Leader at the Max Planck institute for Molecular Genetics, Berlin, and from 2004 as an assistant and then associate professor with Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas.

Dr. Antebi is currently one of the founding directors of the Max Planck Institute for Biology of Ageing, Cologne, which he has helped lead to become one of the most internationally recognized centers for ageing research in the world. He is also an honorary Professor through the University of Cologne, Center of Excellence Cluster on Cellular Stress Response and Age-associated Disease. Dr. Antebi’s work has focused on endocrine and metabolic regulation of longevity in the small roundworm, Caenorhabditis elegans, an important model system for ageing research. Among his findings, he has discovered that components of developmental clocks can regulate animal life span, and found that small nucleoli are a cellular hallmark of longevity.

He has worked as an editor in chief of the journal “Aging Cell” and served on the scientific advisory boards of the Fritz Lipmann Institute, Jena, University of Lyon-NeuroMyoGene Institute, and the Nathan Shock Center, University of Michigan. Dr. Antebi has won various honors including the prestigious Ellison Medical Foundation Senior Scholar in Aging Award, the Paul Glenn/American Federation for Aging Research Breakthrough in Gerontology Award, the Runnstrom Lecture Award, the ADPS Longevity Award, the ERC Advanced Grant, and is an EMBO fellow.

About the Max Planck Institute for Biology of Ageing

Research at the Max Planck Institute for Biology of Ageing is dedicated to deciphering the mystery of growing old: Why do organisms age at all? How can we influence our ageing and lifespan? And how can we ensure that with increasing age, our bodies remain vital and healthy?

As one of more than 80 independent non-profit research institutions under the umbrella of the Max Planck Society, the overall goal of our institute is thus to understand the natural ageing process and to discover how to intervene in it to ameliorate age-related diseases.

Official Website: https://www.age.mpg.de/

About the Scheibye-Knudsen Laboratory

The growing proportion of the elderly population represents an increasing socioeconomic challenge, not least because of age-associated diseases. It is therefore increasingly pertinent to find interventions for age-associated diseases such as Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s and cardiovascular diseases. Although the cause of aging is currently unknown accumulation of damage to our genome, the DNA, may be a contributing factor.

In the Scheibye-Knudsen lab we try to understand the cellular and organismal consequences of DNA damage with the aim of developing interventions. We have discovered that DNA damage leads to changes in certain metabolites and that replenishment of these molecules may alter the rate of aging in model organisms. These findings suggest that normal aging and age-associated diseases may be malleable to similar interventions. The hope is to develop interventions that will allow everyone to live healthier, happier and more productive lives.

Laboratory website: http://scheibye-knudsen.com/

About the University of Copenhagen

With over 40,000 students and more than 9,000 employees, the University of Copenhagen is the largest institution of research and education in Denmark and among the highest ranked universities in Europe. The purpose of the University – to quote the University Statute – is to ‘conduct research and provide further education to the highest academic level’. Approximately one hundred different institutes, departments, laboratories, centres, museums, etc., form the nucleus of the University.

University Website: http://introduction.ku.dk/presentation/

About Basel Life 2019


Aging Research for Drug Discovery Forum description

In this symposium, leaders in the aging, longevity, and drug discovery field will describe the latest progress in the molecular, cellular and organismal basis of aging and the search for interventions. Furthermore, the forum will include opinion leaders in AI to discuss the latest advances of this technology in the biopharmaceutical sector and how this can be applied to interventions. This event intends to bridge academic and commercial research and foster collaborations that will result in practical solutions to one of humanity’s most challenging problems: aging. A panel of thought-leaders will give us their cutting edge reports on the latest progress in our quest to extend the healthy lifespan of everyone on the planet.

Conference Official Website: https://www.basellife.org/2019.html

Media Contact
Ola Popova
[email protected]

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