AAAS announces leading scientists elected as 2020 fellows (contd.)

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Credit: Courtesy of AAAS

For Part 1 of this announcement, click here.

SECTION ON GENERAL INTEREST IN SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING

Nan Broadbent Seismological Society of America: For outstanding contributions as a science communicator for scientific societies, particularly the American Association for the Advancement of Science and the Seismological Society of America.

Tinsley Davis National Association of Science Writers: For distinguished leadership that has increased the vibrancy of the U.S. science writing community, enhanced public engagement with science, and strengthened science communication globally.

Linda D. Harrar WGBH Educational Foundation: For tireless devotion and outstanding leadership in television science journalism focusing on human health, the global environment, biodiversity, and remarkable women leaders in developing countries.

James H. Lambert University of Virginia: For distinguished contributions to the field of risk analysis, particularly using systems engineering tools to address critical infrastructure risk and resilience.

Andrew D. Maynard Arizona State University: For distinguished contributions to the public’s understanding of science, risk and responsible innovation in the fields of nanotechnology, artificial intelligence and other emerging technologies.

Jeremy B. Searle Cornell University: For distinguished contributions in the field of evolutionary biology and for the promotion of science through teaching, international work, media activities and science-based natural history.

Ronald M. Thom Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (Emeritus): For distinguished contributions to coastal and estuarine ecosystem restoration, in assessment of cumulative effects of multiple restoration actions and adaptive management of restored systems.

Cliff Wang U.S. Army Research Office / North Carolina State University: For distinguished contributions to the field of science of security, and outstanding leadership in national research and transforming results into high impact cyber defense capabilities.

Nan Yao Princeton University: For outstanding achievements in materials and structural analysis and distinguished contributions in related education, research, and service to advance science and engineering and their applications.

SECTION ON GEOLOGY AND GEOGRAPHY

Li An San Diego State University: For distinguished contributions to complex human-environmental systems theory and methodological breakthroughs in modeling human decisions, agent-based modeling, land survival & latent trajectory analysis.

David Cairns Texas A&M University: For distinguished contributions to the understanding of tree-line dynamics and cold-climate ecotones, along with fostering interdisciplinary Arctic science and academic administration.

Richard Walter Carlson Carnegie Institution for Science: For outstanding research, leadership, innovation and service to the community in geochemistry and geology.?

Charles B. “Chuck” Connor University of South Florida: For distinguished contributions to the field of geosciences, particularly for advancement of volcanology and natural hazard assessment through development of numerical models of volcanic phenomena.

Peter B. de Menocal Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution: For fundamental contributions to understanding human physical and cultural evolution in relation to paleo-environmental change on the African continent.

Andrea Donnellan NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory: In recognition of outstanding research, innovation, project management and service to the community in geodesy, seismology, geophysics and technology.

Joshua S. Fu University of Tennessee, Knoxville: For distinguished contributions to the field of air quality and climate modeling and informing national and international management and policies involving these issues.

George Helz University of Maryland, College Park: In recognition of outstanding research, leadership, innovation, teaching and service to the community in aqueous and environmental geochemistry.

Tessa M. Hill University of California, Davis: For outstanding contributions to research, teaching and outreach related to processes in the past and present oceans based on geochemistry and paleobiology.

David A. Hodell University of Cambridge (United Kingdom): For distinguished contributions to the field of paleoclimatology, including the processes responsible for the Ice Ages and the impact of climate change on ancient civilizations.

“Max” Qinhong Hu The University of Texas at Arlington: For outstanding and sustained contributions in the research field of nano-petrophysics within the context of energy geosciences, teaching & mentorship, and service to professional society.

Hitoshi Kawakatsu The University of Tokyo (Japan): In recognition of outstanding research, innovation, project management and service to the community in seismology, geophysics and technology.

Sheryl Luzzadder-Beach The University of Texas at Austin: For distinguished contributions to the field of geoarchaeology, particularly the hydrology and geomorphology of the ancient Maya world.

Vicki McConnell Geological Society of America: In recognition of outstanding research, leadership, project management and service to the community in geology and volcanology.

Carolyn Olson U.S. Geological Survey: In recognition of outstanding research, leadership, project management and service to the community in soil science, agriculture, hydrology and climate change.

Lewis A. Owen North Carolina State University: For distinguished contributions to the field of Quaternary paleoenvironmental change & landscape evolution in tectonically active regions.

David Sandwell Scripps Institution of Oceanography: For recognition of outstanding research, innovation, project management and service to the community in geodesy, geophysics and oceanography.

Nathan Dale Sheldon University of Michigan: For distinguished contributions and extraordinary achievements in developing, refining, and applying geochemical measurements of paleosols to reconstructing paleo-pC02 levels and ancient climates on Earth.

May Yuan The University of Texas at Dallas: For contributions to fundamental and applied geographic information science, especially by developing new data models and analytical methods to address problems of significant societal concerns.

SECTION ON HISTORY AND PHILOSOPHY OF SCIENCE

Colin Allen University of Pittsburgh: For his significant contributions to philosophy of science, philosophy of biology, philosophy of cognitive science, and in logic, computation and artificial intelligence.

Rachel Ankeny University of Adelaide (Australia): For her contributions to our understanding of the foundational roles that organisms play in biological research and her leadership in history and philosophy of science.

David Cassidy Hofstra University: For distinguished contributions to the fields of history and physics, his broader scholarship linking physics and societal challenges, and communicating science to the public.

Marsha L. Richmond Wayne State University: For foundational contributions to the history of evolution and genetics, particularly the role of women investigators, and distinguished service to the history of science profession.

SECTION ON INDUSTRIAL SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY

Suresh K. Bhargava RMIT University (Australia): For an exceptional contribution to the fields of industrial chemistry and technology, particularly for molecular engineering, catalysis and nanotechnology bringing innovative solutions to the industries.

Aaron Dominguez Catholic University of America: For distinguished contributions to experimental high-energy physics.

Johney B. Green National Renewable Energy Laboratory: For distinguished contributions and technical leadership that have made innovative and impactful contributions in the fields of energy efficiency, transportation, renewable power, and systems engineering.

James D. Kindscher University of Kansas Medical Center: For distinguished contributions to the field of anesthesiology, public health, operating room management, and liver transplantation.

Daniela Rus Massachusetts Institute of Technology: For distinguished contributions to robotics, mobile computing, and data science.

Steven Suib University of Connecticut: For preeminent contributions to the tailored synthesis, characterization and practical assessment of novel catalysts, surfaces, ceramics and other materials of industrial significance.

Erik B. Svedberg National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine: For distinguished contributions to materials research, particularly thin films, and for guidance to science and engineering policy making processes in the materials and manufacturing fields.

SECTION ON INFORMATION, COMPUTING AND COMMUNICATION

James Allen University of Rochester / Institute for Human and Machine Cognition : For broad contributions to artificial intelligence and natural language understanding, including seminal contributions in temporal logic.

James Hampton Anderson University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill: For contributions to the implementation and analysis of multiprocessor and multicore real-time systems, and for service to the real-time systems research community.

Carla Brodley Northeastern University: For outstanding national service towards diversifying computing combined with broadly impactful research in the field of machine learning.

Lorrie Cranor Carnegie Mellon University: For contributions to usable privacy and security research, policy and education.

Pedro Domingos University of Washington: For wide-ranging contributions to artificial intelligence and machine learning, especially the introduction of Markov Logic Networks to unify logical and probabilistic reasoning.

Kenneth D. Forbus Northwestern University: For distinguished contributions to artificial intelligence, particularly the use of qualitative reasoning, machine learning, and natural language understanding.

Yolanda Gil University of Southern California: For outstanding contributions to the field of artificial intelligence for supporting scientific discovery.

Leana Golubchik University of Southern California: For distinguished contributions to design and analysis of multimedia and content collection systems, and sustained dedication to fostering careers of women in science and engineering.

Yuri Gurevich University of Michigan: For distinguished contributions to logic, particularly finite model theory, and the development of abstract state machines.

Murat Kantarcioglu The University of Texas at Dallas: For distinguished contributions to the field of secure and privacy-preserving data storage, querying, and mining, and adversarial machine learning.

Maria Klawe Harvey Mudd College: For exceptional leadership and contributions to increasing the participation of women in computer science and STEM fields.

Peter M. Kogge University of Notre Dame: For distinguished contributions to the field of computer architecture, particularly including massively parallel processing architectures.

Patrick Drew McDaniel Penn State: For distinguished contributions to the field of computational security and privacy, particularly for advancing algorithms for the formal analysis of mobile devices and applications.

Debasis Mitra Columbia University: For distinguished contributions to the field of networks and systems, particularly for mathematical modeling, design and optimization.

John Douglas Owens University of California, Davis: For fundamental contributions to commodity parallel computing, particularly in the development of GPU algorithms, data structures, and applications.

Timothy Mark Pinkston University of Southern California: For distinguished contributions to the field of computer architecture, particularly interconnection network routing algorithms, and leadership in expanding computing research and broadening participation in computing.

William C. Regli University of Maryland, College Park: For his work at the interface between science and government primarily at the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency.

Munindar P. Singh North Carolina State University: For distinguished contributions to the field of computer science, particularly to foundations of multiagent systems and their applications in service-oriented computing, sociotechnical systems, and governance.

Anuj Srivastava Florida State University: For distinguished contributions to the field of statistical pattern recognition, particularly for development of differential geometric approaches to statistical shape analysis.

David Touretzky Carnegie Mellon University: For combining high quality impactful research in machine learning with equally high quality impactful educationalactivities using robotics to engage students in computing.

Jeffrey S. Vetter Oak Ridge National Laboratory: For leadership, innovation, and distinguished contributions to high performance computing, particularly to extreme-scale heterogeneous architectures and programming systems.

Toby Walsh University of New South Wales – Sydney and CSIRO Data61 (Australia): For intellectual leadership and significant contributions to automated deduction, constraint programming, and fairness in artificial intelligence.

Daniel S. Weld University of Washington/ Allen Institute for Artificial Intelligence: For distinguished contributions to artificial intelligence planning, software agents, crowdsourcing, and internet information extraction as well as the commercialization of artificial intelligence technologies.

Hui Xiong Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey: For distinguished contributions to the fields of data mining and mobile computing.

SECTION ON LINGUISTICS & LANGUAGE SCIENCES

John Baugh Washington University in St. Louis: For distinguished contributions to scholarly work, combined with major contributions in bringing linguistic science to bear on issues of public policy and social justice.

Bryan Gick University of British Columbia (Canada): For distinguished contributions to the field of experimental phonetics, notably for advances in multimodal perception and biomechanics.

Colin Phillips University of Maryland: For outstanding contributions to psycholinguistics, advocacy for Linguistics and Language Science, superior mentorship and teaching, and a vision of what linguistic education should be.

Joan A. Sereno University of Kansas: For distinguished contributions to the field of linguistics and the language sciences, particularly for psycholinguistic investigations of the multimodal mechanisms underlying language comprehension and production and their neurological foundations.

Matthew W. Wagers University of California, Santa Cruz: For innovative research extending the methodology of experimental psycholinguistics to investigations of understudied minority languages.

SECTION ON MATHEMATICS

Harold P. Boas Texas A&M University: For outstanding contributions to research in complex analysis, communication of mathematics, and service to the profession.

Leslie Hogben Iowa State University/ American Institute of Mathematics: For distinguished contributions to the field of linear algebra and mentoring the next generation of mathematicians.

Kristin Lauter Microsoft Research: For distinguished contributions to computational number theory, particularly for path-breaking work on homomorphic encryption, and for effective leadership in advancing careers of women in mathematics.

Paul K. Newton University of Southern California: For outstanding contributions in applied mathematics, mathematical oncology, and the development of nonlinear dynamical systems models of the Euler and Navier-Stokes equations.

Esmond G. Ng Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory: For distinguished contributions to research in numerical algebra and high-performance computing, and for scientific leadership.

Karen Hunger Parshall University of Virginia: For outstanding contributions to the history of mathematics, combined with extraordinary service to the mathematical and historical sciences.

Malgorzata Peszynska Oregon State University: For outstanding contributions to multidisciplinary mathematical and computational modeling of flow and transport in porous media.

Jack Xin University of California, Irvine: For outstanding contributions to research in applied mathematics and data science.

SECTION ON MEDICAL SCIENCES

Stephen B. Baylin Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine: For seminal research supporting the concept that epigenetically mediated loss of gene function is a major player in the progression of cancer.

Barbara D. Beck Gradient: For meritorious contributions to the fields of toxicology and risk assessment, particularly for pioneering work on the evaluation of health risks of environmental chemicals.

Yasmine Belkaid National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Disease/NIH: For seminal work on host-microbe interactions in tissues, recently demonstrating the induction of adaptive immunity to skin and gut pathogens requires microbiota.

Barry B. Bercu University of South Florida: For distinguished contributions and foundational research advancing the field of pediatric endocrinology and for seminal characterizations of Growth Hormone Neurosecretory Dysfunction and the “Bercu Patient”.

Shi-Yuan Cheng Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine: For outstanding contributions in molecular and translational cancer research, by developing and exploiting cellular and preclinical models for human tumor biology and therapy.

Keith C. Cheng Penn State College of Medicine: For distinguished contributions to functional genomics and imaging, particularly related to zebrafish as a model organism for human disease and skin pigmentation genetics.

Ronald W. Davis Stanford University: For pioneering work in functional genomics and clinical genomics, and in particular his development of novel technologies.

Catherine Drennan Massachusetts Institute of Technology: For her structures of metalloenzymes and insights that show how nature harnesses and redirects the reactivity of enzyme metallocenters to perform challenging reactions.

Dongsheng Duan University of Missouri: For distinguished contributions toward the development of adeno-associated virus transduction biology, and particularly for advances in viral gene therapy for Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

Carol Fuzeti Elias University of Michigan: For distinguished contributions to the field of reproductive and metabolic physiology, particularly for elucidating the mechanisms that couple metabolism to the neuroendocrine control of reproduction.

Hudson Freeze Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute: For identifying and characterizing the mechanistic underpinnings of many glycosylation diseases and work towards new treatments.

Marcia B. Goldberg Massachusetts General Hospital/Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health: For distinguished contribution to the field of microbial pathogenesis, particularly the molecular mechanisms of host-pathogen interactions.

David H. Gutmann Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis: For distinguished contributions to the field of human neurogenetics, particularly for defining the cellular and molecular etiologies underlying the pathogenesis of neurofibromatosis and related disorders.

Thomas H. Haines City College of New York (Retired): For initiating and setting up the CUNY Medical School at City College of New York to educate minority and disadvantaged students.

Raymond C. Harris Vanderbilt University School of Medicine: For distinguished contributions to the field of nephrology particularly in elucidating hormonal regulation of renal function.

Jeffrey P. Krischer University of South Florida: For distinguished contributions in diabetes research, particularly for advancing understanding of mechanisms of autoimmunity and disease progression and designing, conducting, analyzing multi-center clinical trials worldwide.

Thomas E. Lane University of California, Irvine: For distinguished research and service in the field of neurodegenerative disease including Multiple Sclerosis and in spinal cord repair.

W. Jonathan Lederer University of Maryland School of Medicine: For contributions to our understanding of calcium signaling in cardiac, smooth and skeletal muscle, and fundamental discoveries in chemo-mechanical transduction, mitochondrial biology, and cardiac electrophysiology.

Bruce T. Liang University of Connecticut School of Medicine: For distinguished contributions to physiology and pharmacology, elucidating novel therapeutic targets and advancing them for translation.

Jeffrey D. Lifson Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research: For distinguished contributions to innovative scientific and collaborative support of AIDS research, sustained quality mentorship, and scientific community service over multiple decades.

Faina Linkov Duquesne University : For services to biobehavioral cancer research and for improving publishing opportunities to scientists in the developing world.

Shan-Lu Liu The Ohio State University: For distinguished contributions to our understanding of virus-host interaction and viral pathogenesis, as well as impact on scientific communication, diversity, and international collaboration.

Karl L. Magleby University of Miami, School of Medicine: For notable contributions to ion channel biophysics as the molecular basis of synaptic transmission, and by pioneering electrophysiological and computational approaches that advanced the field.

Sendurai Mani The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center: For demonstrating that cancer can make its own cancer stem cells and promote plasticity, resulting in metastasis and chemoresistance by activating latent embryonic epithelial-mesenchymal transition.

Douglas L. Mann Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis: For distinguished contributions to cardiology, particularly for discovering the role of cytokine mediated inflammation in producing heart failure and for suggesting novel therapeutic approaches based on this concept.

Rodger P. McEver Oklahoma Medical Research Foundation: For services to cardiovascular biology and hematology; in particular to understanding the forces that govern cell-cell adhesion, and for distinguished scientific leadership.

Ross Erwin McKinney, Jr. Association of American Medical Colleges: For critical work developing therapies for children with HIV infection and advancing the national dialogue regarding conflicts of interest, informed consent, and other ethical issues.

Hiroyoshi Nishikawa National Cancer Center / Nagoya University (Japan): For distinguished contributions to the field of tumor immunology and immunotherapy, particularly for basic understanding of regulatory T cells in animal models and patients with cancer.

Richard M. Peek Vanderbilt University Medical Center: For distinguished contributions to the field of microbial-induced carcinogenesis, particularly for development of innovative ex vivo and tractable in vivo models to define bacterial oncoproteins.

Sallie R. Permar Duke University: For distinguished contributions to the prevention and treatment of neonatal viral infections, particularly for identification of protective immune responses that guide maternal/infant vaccine development.

W. Kimryn Rathmell Vanderbilt University Medical Center: For distinguished contributions elucidating molecular mechanisms and translational approaches in renal and other hypoxia-driven cancers.

D. Nageshwar Reddy Asian Institute of Gastroenterology (India): For pioneering work in gastroenterology, particularly advances in therapeutic pancreatic biliary endoscopy and innovations in transgastric endoscopic surgery; and for service to international gastroenterology societies.

John Jeffrey Reese Vanderbilt University Medical Center: For distinguished contributions to the field of reproductive biology and fetal vascular development, particularly for insights into prostaglandin signaling and fetal-maternal communication during pregnancy.

Alan Saghatelian Salk Institute for Biological Studies: For mass spectrometry-centered work identifying novel endogenous peptides and lipids in cells, and determining their regulation and targets.

Suzanne Scarlata Worcester Polytechnic Institute: For leadership in the biophysics community and developing fluorescence methods to probe dynamics of signaling proteins both in vivo and in vitro.

Brian Leslie Strom Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey: For distinguished contributions to the field of pharmacoepidemiology, the study of the use and effects of pharmaceuticals in populations.

Jie Tian Chinese Academy of Sciences (China): For distinguished contributions to the field of multi-modality molecular imaging technologies and radiomics, and its biomedical applications and clinical translation.

Jerrold Ross Turner Brigham and Women’s Hospital/Harvard Medical School: For distinguished contributions to cell biology, physiology, pathobiology, and diagnosis in gastrointestinal science, particularly for defining functions, regulatory mechanisms, and molecular therapies targeting mucosal barriers.

Matthew Bret Weinger Vanderbilt University Medical Center: For distinguished contributions to the fields of human factors, clinician performance, and patient safety.

SECTION ON NEUROSCIENCE

Patrick Aebischer Swiss Federal Institute of Technology Lausanne (Switzerland): For his pioneering studies in the use of virus for modelling diseases and gene therapy and innovative leadership of a major academic center.

Michel Baudry Western University of Health Sciences: For distinguished contributions to the field of molecular and translational neuroscience, in particular, to the understanding of the roles of calpain-1 and calpain-2 in synaptic plasticity and neurodegeneration.

Nicole Calakos Duke University: For pioneering work in optogenetic approaches, and substantial contributions in the area of synaptic plasticity with a focus on striatal circuity of the basal ganglia.

Gabriel Corfas University of Michigan: For distinguished contributions to the field of cellular and molecular neuroscience, particularly on the roles and mechanisms of neuron-glia interactions and their implications to disease.

Aaron DiAntonio Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis: For distinguished contributions to the field of molecular and cellular neuroscience, particularly for studies of axon injury response pathways and mechanisms of pathological axon degeneration.

Nita A. Farahany Duke University: For distinguished contributions to the field of neuroethics, enabling responsible and equitable development and implementation of new knowledge and technologies in neuroscience.

Eva Lucille Feldman University of Michigan: For distinguished contributions to neuroscience and neurology, particularly through leadership, mentoring, and basic and clinical research, leading to new disease therapies and important clinical guidelines.

Eberhard Erich Fetz University of Washington: For pioneering contributions to understanding the role of the cerebral cortex in control of ocular and forelimb movements, and to motor circuit plasticity.

Alan L. Goldin University of California, Irvine: For distinguished contributions in understanding the function of sodium channels and their role in seizure susceptibility, and for promoting the development of physician-scientists.

Steve A.N. Goldstein University of California, Irvine School of Medicine: For making- outstanding contributions to the basic understanding of ion channels and their function, and for striving to create structural support and integration for biomedical science education and training.

John Krystal Yale University: For transformative contributions to human neuroscience, particularly work on glutamate signaling and resultant development of ketamine as a novel rapid antidepressant.

Debomoy (Deb) K. Lahiri Indiana University: For distinguished contributions to the field of molecular and translational neuroscience, particularly roles of epigenetics and microRNA on neuronal physiology and eventually treating human neurodegenerative diseases.

Stephen G. Lisberger Duke University: For fundamental contributions to understanding of the organization and function of brain mechanisms that underlie sensorimotor learning, using visually-driven eye movements as a model system.

Wendy Blair Macklin University of Colorado Denver: For ground breaking studies on oligodendrocyte differentiation and myelin formation in healthy development and pathological situations and high level contributions to teaching and administration.

Stefan M. Pulst University of Utah: For distinguished contributions to neurology, including discovery of genes responsible for ataxias and ALS, and for leadership in professional organizations and academic departments of neurology.

Nirao M. Shah Stanford University: For exceptional contributions to the field of behavioral neuroscience, particularly the dissection of neural circuits and transcriptomics controlling social behaviors.

Steven L. Small The University of Texas at Dallas: For distinguished contributions to the neurobiology of language, particularly in brain imaging of speech and language, and in founding the society and journal.

Paul Taghert Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis: For distinguished contributions to the field of circadian rhythm neuroscience, including the role of neuropeptide signaling in chronobiology.

Rachel Tyndale Centre for Addiction and Mental Health /University of Toronto (Canada): For outstanding contributions to understanding of the role of drug metabolism in addiction and in particular, how genetic polymorphisms alter behaviors relevant to nicotine addiction.

Linda Jo Van Eldik University of Kentucky College of Medicine: For distinguished contributions on how aberrant glia-neuronal interactions impact neurodegenerative processes, focusing on identification of signal transduction pathways that mediate neuroinflammatory responses of activated glia.

SECTION ON PHARMACEUTICAL SCIENCES

Patricia Babbitt University of California, San Francisco: For distinguished contributions to the field of computational biology and bioinformatics particularly related to protein structure/function and applications to drug target identification and drug design.

Joseph R. Haywood Michigan State University: For distinguished contributions to the field of cardiovascular pharmacology, particularly on central nervous system control of blood pressure and for leadership in the biomedical sciences.

Julie A. Johnson University of Florida: For significant discoveries in cardiovascular drug pharmacogenomics, and for advancing use of genetic data in clinical practice to improve clinical outcomes with drug therapy.

Lyn H. Jones Dana-Farber Cancer Institute: For distinguished contributions to the field of medicinal chemistry, particularly using chemical biology to advance drug discovery research.

M.N.V. Ravi Kumar Texas A&M University: For distinguished contributions to the field of drug delivery, particularly the next-generation polyesters and non-competitive targeting strategies are of profound significance to the human health.

Susan L. Mooberry University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio: For distinguished contributions to the field of cancer pharmacology, particularly on discovery and development of natural product anti-microtubule agents for treatment of cancer.

Walter H. Moos University of California, San Francisco: For distinguished contributions to the fields of pharmaceutical sciences and medicinal chemistry targeting human health and disease.

Raymond Felix Schinazi Emory University School of Medicine: For distinguished contributions to the field of pharmacology and medicinal chemistry, particularly for antiviral therapies that have saved millions of lives.

Thomas D. Schmittgen University of Florida: For distinguished contributions to the field of microRNA biology, particularly using real time PCR to quantify microRNA expression in tissues, extracellular vesicles, cell lines and tumors.

SECTION ON PHYSICS

Charles H. Bennett IBM Thomas J. Watson Research Center: For seminal contributions to quantum information science, in particular for the founding and development of the areas of quantum cryptography and quantum teleportation.

Eberhard Bodenschatz Max Planck Institute for Dynamics and Self Organization (Germany): For outstanding research and administrative contributions to nonlinear science including fluid turbulence, cardiac dynamics, cloud physics, thermal convection, chemotaxis, and Lagrangian dynamics.

Steven E. Boggs University of California, San Diego: For his contributions to high energy astrophysics, including gamma ray sources and nucleosynthesis, and his leadership in science administration at the Universities of California, Berkeley and San Diego.

Jesse Brewer University of British Columbia (Canada): For his pioneering work developing muSR, in which muons are used to probe quantum materials, with critical applications ranging from high-temperature superconductivity to solid-state chemistry.

Bulbul Chakraborty Brandeis University: For important theoretical contributions to diverse areas of condensed matter physics, particularly disordered systems including frustrated magnets and granular materials.

Andre De Gouvea Northwestern University: For his contributions to our understanding of the physics of neutrinos and their role in extensions of the Standard Model of particle physics.

Peter Fisher Massachusetts Institute of Technology: For imaginative contributions to at the interface of particle, nuclear and cosmic ray physics, and for his leadership in promoting a values-based approach to science policy.

Chris L. Fryer Los Alamos National Laboratory: For distinguished contributions to computational and theoretical astrophysics.

Alexandra Gade Michigan State University: For distinguished contributions to the field of nuclear physics, particularly for gamma-ray spectroscopy of rare isotopes and elucidating the structural properties of nuclei.

Graciela Gelmini University of California, Los Angeles: For her contributions to our understanding of dark matter and the Universe

Neil Gershenfeld Massachusetts Institute of Technology: For his insights at the intersection of physics and computer science, in areas ranging from the physics of information technology to digital fabrication

Tony Gherghetta University of Minnesota: For distinguished contributions to the field of theoretical particle physics, particularly using extra dimensions to study grand unification, supersymmetry and the fermion mass hierarchy.

Marcelo Jaime Los Alamos National Laboratory: For distinguished contributions to the field of experimental physics, particularly for the study of strongly correlated electron systems and quantum phase transitions in extreme magnetic fields.

Spencer R. Klein Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory / University of California, Berkeley: For distinguished contributions in the interface of astrophysics, nuclear physics, and particle physics, including neutrino astrophysics and ultra-peripheral collisions of heavy ions.

Yuri V. Kovchegov The Ohio State University: For foundational contributions to the theoretical understanding of parton saturation effects in Quantum Chromodynamics and their manifestation in high-energy collisions with strongly interacting particles.

Ying-Cheng Lai Arizona State University: For distinguished contributions to the field of nonlinear dynamics and chaos, particularly in relativistic quantum chaos and transient chaos.

Konrad W. Lehnert National Institute of Standards and Technology / University of Colorado, Boulder: For pioneering contributions to quantum science, particularly quantum control and measurement of mechanical oscillators, and sub-quantum limited measurement with applications to dark matter searches.

Manfred Lindner Max Planck Institute for Nuclear Physics (Germany): For distinguished contributions to both theoretical and experimental particle physics, particularly through advancing the technology to use ultra-clean detectors to probe weakly interacting particles.

Eric Mazur Harvard University: For advancing the physics and applications of ultrashort-pulse lasers and nonlinear optical devices, and for sparking worldwide adoption of active learning techniques through Peer Instruction.

Michael A. McGuire Oak Ridge National Laboratory: For distinguished contributions to materials physics, particularly the use of crystal growth and solid-state chemistry to discover and study thermoelectric, superconducting, magnetic, and 2D materials.

Roberto Morandotti INRS – National Institute of Scientific Research (Canada): For distinguished contributions to the field of nonlinear and quantum optics, particularly for his work on photonics lattices, nondiffractive beams, frequency microcombs and THz technology.

Jason Petta Princeton University: For seminal contributions to the development of quantum computing devices using semiconducting quantum dots.

Thomas Proffen Oak Ridge National Laboratory: For his contribution to the development of techniques to determine the local structure of materials and his leadership in promoting scientific excitement among young people.

Laura J. Pyrak-Nolte Purdue University: For outstanding contributions to understanding the physics of fractures in rocks and their interactions with fluids and seismic waves.

Talat Shahnaz Rahman University of Central Florida: For distinguished contributions to computational and theoretical nanoscience, in predictions of chemical, vibrational, and structural properties of low-dimensional systems, together with diversity in STEM.

Susan Seestrom Sandia National Laboratories: For her pathbreaking work in nuclear physics, especially using ultra cold neutrons, and for her leadership, both in her community and at national laboratories.

Jonathan V. Selinger Kent State University: For contributions to the theoretical physics of liquid crystals and other soft materials.

Arthur John Stewart Smith Princeton University: For his many contributions to physics, especially for his leadership of the BaBar experiment, which led to discovery of CP violation in the B system.

Christopher Stubbs Harvard University: For his pathbreaking work at the intersection of particle physics, gravitational physics, and cosmology, and for his contributions to arms control and international security issues.

Nandini Trivedi The Ohio State University: For her contributions to the theoretical understanding of quantum matter, characterized by innovative use of quantum Monte Carlo techniques and close experimental collaborations.

Yuhai Tu IBM Thomas J. Watson Research Center: For distinguished contributions to the field of biological physics, particularly using statistical physics methods to study dynamics and energetics of information processing in living systems.

Clare Yu University of California, Irvine: For her contributions across condensed matter and biological physics, with special emphasis on disordered systems, intracellular transport, the physics of cancer, and quantum computing.

Anvar A. Zakhidov The University of Texas at Dallas: For creative, pioneering contributions to design, processing & understanding of functional nanomaterials: nanotubes, fullerenes, perovskites.

SECTION ON PSYCHOLOGY

Tammy D. Allen University of South Florida: For distinguished contributions to the field of psychology, particularly pioneering advancements in the nascent area of work-family interface, and developing theories, methodologies and tools.

Peter R. Finn Indiana University: For distinguished contributions to the field of Clinical Psychology, particularly for the study of decision making, behavioral disinhibition, and cognitive function in Substance Use Disorders.

Howard Goldstein University of South Florida: For distinguished contributions to the field of psychology, particularly for development of intervention strategies to promote early development of language, literacy, and social skills.

William (Bill) P. Hetrick Indiana University: For distinguished contributions to the field of experimental psychopathology, particularly for understanding sensorimotor and cognitive function in schizophrenia spectrum disorders.

Stefan Hofmann Boston University: For distinguished contributions to the study and practice of cognitive behavioral therapy, especially for anxiety disorders.

Elaine Hull Florida State University: For distinguished research on the neuroendocrine control of male rat sexual behavior, including the role of dopamine and glutamate in sexual experience.

Blair T. Johnson University of Connecticut: For distinguished contributions both in methodology to cumulate evidence accurately, and in theory in relation to psychological phenomena.

Angeline S. Lillard University of Virginia: For distinguished contributions to developmental science in theory of mind, children’s play, and education, and particularly for establishing the scientific basis of Montessori schooling.

Raymond G. Miltenberger University of South Florida: For significant contributions advancing applied behavior analysis research, including pioneering functional assessment to improve clinical outcomes and in-situ assessment and training to enhance generalization.

Jay Myung The Ohio State University: For distinguished applied and basic research on computational cognition, Bayesian cognitive modeling, optimal experimental design, adaptive design optimization, model selection and evaluation, and neural networks.

Steven L. Neuberg Arizona State University: For distinguished contributions integrating evolutionary and social psychology to understand how fundamental social goals direct social perception, social cognition, and social behavior.

Barbara A. Wanchisen National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine: For outstanding leadership in supporting and promoting the behavioral, psychological, and cognitive sciences, including securing funding and overseeing reports on pressing applied research topics.

Cathy Spatz Widom John Jay College of Criminal Justice: For distinguished contributions to the fields of criminology and traumatic stress, particularly her research on the consequences and intergenerational transmission of child abuse and neglect.

SECTION ON SOCIAL, ECONOMIC AND POLITICAL SCIENCES

John Maron Abowd U.S. Census Bureau/ Cornell University: For distinguished contribution to the statistical understanding of U.S. population dynamics, and the critical role of the census in shaping public policy and understanding.

Melissa S. Anderson University of Minnesota: For seminal contributions to the science of research integrity and to the study of scientists and higher education, and for excellence in fostering responsible conduct.

Janet Box-Steffensmeier The Ohio State University: For distinguished contributions to political methodology, including duration analysis and time series, and service to the advancement of political methodology and study of American politics.

R. Alta Charo University of Wisconsin – Madison: For influential work on bioethics and public policy, including outstanding scholarship incorporating ideas and research from philosophy, law, biology and the social and behavioral sciences.

Nazli Choucri Massachusetts Institute of Technology: For innovative contributions and continuing impact at the interface of international relations and cybersecurity and for work on global sustainability problems and solution strategies.

Elizabeth Cooksey The Ohio State University: For distinguished contributions to the field of social demography, with specializations, in life course transitions, adolescent sexual behavior, and the development of youth and children.

Paul Allen David Stanford University: For contributions to theoretical and statistical “new economic history” of U.S., path dependence, and economics of science and technology.

Joane P. Nagel University of Kansas: For distinguished contributions to the scientific study of race, ethnicity, gender, and sexuality as they shape political actions, social movements, and engagement.

Kristen Olson University of Nebraska-Lincoln: For distinguished contributions to survey research methodology, particularly understanding and reducing measurement and survey nonresponse errors, service to the field, and commitment to mentoring students.

Susan E. Short Brown University: For important contributions to the fields of Chinese and African social demography and to interdisciplinary science at the intersection of genetics, gender, and social structure.

SECTION ON SOCIETAL IMPACTS OF SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING

Gregg M. Garfin University of Arizona: For linking fundamental climate and paleoclimate science to climate services and decision making, through climate assessment, knowledge exchange, and the development of translational ecology.

Leah Gerber Arizona State University: For leadership in balancing conservation priority-setting, ecosystem-based management, adaptive monitoring, marine recreation, endangered species recovery plans, and estimating extinction risk.

Ramanan Laxminarayan Center for Disease Dynamics, Economics & Policy/Princeton University: For distinguished contributions to the field of economic epidemiology, with particular reference to the spread and control of antimicrobial resistance.

Mary E. Maxon Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory: For outstanding contributions to science-informed policymaking, wise policies for life sciences research, research management, and science philanthropy.

James Bradley Miller Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History: For vision, leadership, dedication, and distinguished contributions to addressing long-standing obstacles to public understanding of science and technology, particularly within religious communities.

Oladele (Dele) A. Ogunseitan University of California, Irvine: For distinguished contributions in studies using fundamental science to inform impacts of toxic components in manufacturing on human and environmental health with significant societal impacts.

Lawrence J. Satkowiak Oak Ridge National Laboratory: For distinguished contributions to verification and security for nuclear and radiological material, which have helped protect the world from nuclear terrorism.

Vaughan Charles Turekian National Academies of Sciences, Engineering and, Medicine: For outstanding contributions to global scientific progress, international scientific advice, international scientific cooperation, and science diplomacy.

SECTION ON STATISTICS

Sudipto Banerjee University of California, Los Angeles: For innovative contributions to Bayesian methodology with focus on spatially indexed information, for high-impact applications, for educational and mentoring excellence, professional service and academic administration.

David L. Banks Duke University: For leadership at the Statistical and Applied Mathematical Sciences Institute, research on risk analysis, and editorial service.

Deborah J. Donnell Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center: For distinguished contributions to the field of HIV prevention research, particularly for design and analysis of clinical trials of pre-exposure prophylaxis and treatment as prevention.

Timothy C. Hesterberg Google, Inc.: For excellent research in importance sampling and bootstrap methodology, important contributions to statistics education using resampling, and outstanding leadership and service to the profession.

Qi Long University of Pennsylvania: For distinguished contributions to analysis of incomplete data, causal inference and analysis of big data for advancing precision health.

Ying Lu Stanford University School of Medicine: For distinguished contributions to the advancement of statistics in medical and biomedical research, particularly for the quality control and risk prediction associated with medical diagnosis.

Richard L. Smith University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill: For distinguished contributions to statistics, particularly the statistical analysis of extreme events and environmental applications including climate change and air pollution.

Elizabeth A. Stuart Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health: For highly influential contributions to development and application of causal inference methods, for excellence in teaching and mentoring, and for distinguished professional leadership in statistics.

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Adam Cohen
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